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Abstract

Sections of our cities have been abandoned to a host of poverty-related social ills whose causes have as much to do with the state of the national and regional economies, structural changes in the job market, and political decision-making as they have to do with individual life-histories and personal misfortune. Bleak outcomes are not inevitable and can be reversed by understanding why faulty policy options were adopted and what it will take to formulate new policies. This essay argues for the need of proactive solutions like in combating our urban povery problem by using, (1) a "Marshall Plan" for cities, (2) using politics as a mechanism for change, and (3) using nonprofit social agencies and other community service organizations to help move the political agenda.

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